Roaring Water Bay

Baltimore - nets-1

Roaring Water Bay is in West Cork. It is also a very short storylet which you can read in my collection SaltWater, now online at the The Journal of Microliterature. I don’t often write really short work, but just occasionally if a piece feels finished I will leave it at under a page. Being so short, this one isn’t typical of the stories in SaltWater, which average at closer to 3,000 words, but like a couple of the others it’s inspired by a family member. There’s been a lot of news lately in Ireland about the women who were locked up in the Magdalene Laundries. Women who were sent to those places had a terrible time, but so did those who were sent out of the country either to have their baby or avoid a scandal afterwards. Though I did not know it as a child growing up, that was what had happened to my mother’s aunt, who inspired the story, and I expect it is one reason she enjoyed spending time with us. The photo of the fishing nets is one that I took in one of the quiet inlets close to Roaring Water Bay. I was in Baltimore to give a reading at the deservedly popular Bushes Bar, and stayed on for a day or two in rooms upstairs over the pub. If you ever visit the islands off West Cork and need an overnight stay en route, it is a well placed stop. Book a front room and you can see when your ferryboat-boat is coming, and run down the pier in time to catch it — always a good feature. More info here in case you ever find yourself  in the area and decide to investigate. And a few more photos.

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2 thoughts on “Roaring Water Bay

  1. I saw an entirely depressing film about the Magdalene Laundries that stayed in my head for an age! My family originally comes from Ireland and I think it’s high time I paid a visit. Especially for the ferries and Guiness. Ciao cat

  2. Yeah, grab a ferry before they stop altogether Cat, like the Cork-Swansea one did! And stop and say hi if you’re passing through Wales ;) Ferries to Dublin are still going strong, though the Ulysses looked light on passengers last time I took it. People seem to prefer the plane. Bizarre, given how much nicer the boat journey is — on the sea route, there’s time to dream.

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